Child protection models for mainstreaming child’s rights

Andrea Rácz

Thinking about and dealing with children, it is extremely important to ensure they get everything that is needed to unfold their skills and potential talents. The professionals working with children have to trust them and children living on the border of child protection, or those living in public care have to be supported in a way that their needs – special and unique – are taken into consideration just the same as if they lived with their families. The recognition of the family’s role in children’s life is inevitable; in care provision, it means the necessity to move towards an integrated, family-community based system of provision, which is capable of ensuring effective service packs for the primary and secondary target group of child protection, adjusting to the dual function of child protection. “Child protection is a social institution that was created to support another social institution, the family, in order to help the family in its tasks related to the child’ development and social inclusion, and if it is necessary, to take over the responsibility for the child from the family which is unable to ensure it.” (Domszky 2011: 3-4). First, the study presents Fox Harding’s typology about the system logics of services for children. Then, we deal with the need of strengthening the rights of children in care and illustrate it by two examples: 1) FICE: tender for good practices in child protection and 2) the Children’s Parliament 2014 which had the theme of social integration.