English

Social Conflicts in the 21st Century – the Shadows of Global Environmental Change

Karl Bruckmeier

The theme of this symposium, “Cultural Heritage and the Innovations of the Humanities in the 21st Century” includes difficult aspects as that of “Social Conflicts in the 21st Century – the Shadows of Global Environmental Change” for which it is not obvious what they include in terms of cultural heritage and humanities. The question, how to deal with new social conflicts can be answered in this perspective of cultural heritage and the new humanities as one that requires new ways of dealing with cultural heritage and innovativeinter- and transdisciplinary thinking; such thinking is spreading in the humanities, in the social and natural sciences, and in the everyday sphere of lifeworld.

Seeking Diamond, But Finding Moissanite: A Case Study On Democratic Political Culture In Contemporary Hungary

Zoltán Berényi

Although since 1990 the indispensable institutional requirements of democracy have been in place in Hungary, studies revealed that Hungarian society in the past 25 years failed to gain sufficiently strong attachment to the norms and values a well functioning democracy requires. Other studies also indicated that these signs, indicating serious shortcomings in democratic political socialization are especially evident in the young generation. In looking for an explanation of this troubling phenomenon political scientists theorised that the low adherence to these values could be the consequence of citizens' low level of activity in voluntary organizations. Could active participation in a voluntary organization reduce the deficits in democratic political socialization?

In order to answer this question, this paper set out to examine to what extent the shortcomings of democratic political socialization could be detected among members of a student association (‘Depolit’) at the University of Debrecen, Hungary.

Workfare with a human face?

Ildikó Asztalos Morell

Public work is currently the major national tool for the reintegration of the long-term unemployed into the world of labour in Hungary. As a result of the expansion of resources the government allotted to facilitate public work employment, labour statistics improved substantially. Nonetheless, public labour as an institution is objected to intense criticism. Since employment as public worker is not bound to citizenship rights, local municipalities have a large degree of discretion about selecting whom they hire. Criticism most often focuses on employment discrimination. In contrast, this research takes a progressive municipality, with anti-discriminatory profile as an example, where public work was adapted as a welfare, rather than purely workfare praxis. Uszka, a rural small-sized municipality, is characterized by high ethnified unemployment. Its politicians and administrators adapted varied strategies to help combat poverty and unemployment. The paper explores the place of public work in the context of social policy instruments and poverty reduction strategies applied and the degrees of freedom and limitations municipalities have in adapting state instruments.

Social Action and the Power of the Irrational

ÁGNES HORVÁTH

At the intersection point of social and cultural anthropology, comparative politics and classical political philosophy we can situate a particularly important aspect of political modernism, the inspiration behind and effect mechanism of a certain irrationalism that is extended into the heart of the modern idea of political action and power. This modern reappearance of irrationality is not without precedents and historical background, but it only became a dominant feature of the modern condition. Modernity, on the one hand, is a pure fantasy world, with no connection to reality; even more, it is based on a deliberate escape from and rejection of reality that nevertheless is projected as being ‘more real’ than reality itself. However, on the other hand, alternating with utopian delusions it always manifested a very subtle receptivity, a keen apprehension of rational thinking; so much so that actual according to the modern phantasy world also pretends to be rational action itself. The apparent contradiction can be resolved by pointing out that both these are rooted in irrationality, in the alienation from existing bonds or the real, expressed by the incommensurable. 

Autonomy and Marginality

GERGŐ PRAZSÁK

We have conducted several researches on values among different deviant groups with the students of Interdisciplinary Social Research Doctoral Program Faculty of Social Sciences of Eötvös Loránd University. Zsolt Nagy works with convalescent alcoholics, Marcell Miletics with homeless people, and Enikő Bódis with prostitutes. In this thesis we focus on the research we have conducted among prostitutes and homeless people. We compare their values to the value system of homeless people. We consider it important, because according to our analysis the value ofself-direction (autonomy) isesteemed highly in both of these groups.

We used Schwartz’s value test as a quantitative method. With the help of the test we compare the value systems – or as Schwartz puts it: the ‘culture’ – of different deviant (marginal) and non-deviant groups. First, we would like to interpret our hypothesis, the applied theories and methods, then, we will explain the results of the quantitative research.

Experiences of service and care planning in the child protection system

Andrea Gyarmati – Andrea Rácz

Basically, the personal needs of the children determine what kinds of services are needed and how these services can provide adequate answers to the child’s problems. As for the local operation, it is based on less established professional principles; the service planning and provision has an ad hoc nature and there is no conscious planning in the child protection. It is also unknown exactly how the needs of the service recipient determine the type of the services that they are accessed to. However it is well known that indentifying different children target groups, and then determining adequate answers in these cases are the only effective way to reduce the extremely high rate of primary and secondary errors in social policy which is currently presenting in the domestic system.

In the case of child protection system it includes how professionally established the proposal for the placement is; whether the utilization of the child protection service is the adequate answer to the children’s need or the children get removed from the family only because there is not available service locally which can meet their specific needs.

Oldalak