English

Child protection models for mainstreaming child’s rights

Andrea Rácz

Thinking about and dealing with children, it is extremely important to ensure they get everything that is needed to unfold their skills and potential talents. The professionals working with children have to trust them and children living on the border of child protection, or those living in public care have to be supported in a way that their needs – special and unique – are taken into consideration just the same as if they lived with their families. The recognition of the family’s role in children’s life is inevitable; in care provision, it means the necessity to move towards an integrated, family-community based system of provision, which is capable of ensuring effective service packs for the primary and secondary target group of child protection, adjusting to the dual function of child protection. “Child protection is a social institution that was created to support another social institution, the family, in order to help the family in its tasks related to the child’ development and social inclusion, and if it is necessary, to take over the responsibility for the child from the family which is unable to ensure it.” (Domszky 2011: 3-4). First, the study presents Fox Harding’s typology about the system logics of services for children. Then, we deal with the need of strengthening the rights of children in care and illustrate it by two examples: 1) FICE: tender for good practices in child protection and 2) the Children’s Parliament 2014 which had the theme of social integration.

Idiosyncrasies of recent growing inequalities in Hungarian income distribution

Balázs Krémer

During past years of financial crises and “great recession” most of the European countries have experienced widening income inequalities. These growing disparities are multifactorial, not simply affected by earned incomes in labor markets, social transfers or fiscal policies and revenue regimes, but also by indirect consequences of earlier running indebtedness and amortizing loans.

This paper attempts to take into account various factors of growing income inequalities, and Hungarian biases from international trends. As a conclusion, we will argue that relatively high and rapid growths of Hungarian inequalities cannot seen and interpreted as an unlucky consequence of great recession, rather as an outcome of intended politics of ruling government.

Dynamics of welfare – social work in the ascendant and under pressure

Franz Hamburger

Trying to talk about the dynamics of welfare in 30 minutes is like the flight of Icarus. If you go too high, your words combust on the abstractness of the theories. If you fly too low, you sink in the water of the various forms of welfare. So I will try to stay in the middle. Perhaps Icarus also managed it for at least 30 minutes.

“Welfare” is not a fixed quantity; it is the subject of political debate, and decisions about it are made in a discursive process. The participants do not, of course, have equal chances of influencing the decision. This presentation of a discourse on welfare goes beyond functionalist theories and looks for the normative bases for welfare.

The provision of day care services for the children in need

Vida Gudžinskienė

The main aim of Day care centers (CDC) for children is the reduction of social exclusion of children and prevention of children removal from the families of origin, complex (social, psychological, pedagogical) support for the child and his/her family - these kind of activities are directly related to the needs of the children at risk. Currently, the highest numbers of disadvantaged families in Lithuania come from Kaunas, Vilnius and Klaipeda counties. The social services within day care centers have been provided for 6873 children in 2012, which is 14.2 percent less than in 2011 and even 18.1 percent less than in 2010.

Managing the unemployment in Hungary

Judit Csoba

With the transition to market economy and after the economy was rebuilt on new foundations, the unfavourable accompanying symptoms – especially unemployment – also had to be addressed. The restructuring and continuous expansion of the system of institutions and instruments devoted to controlling unemployment followed the Western European model in many ways by this time, which had already amassed decades of experience; however, at the same time it was unable to break with its own traditions. The established system of labour market institutions operates in a very centralized way both with respect to its structure and its procedures, and non-state players either do not appear in the system at all or play only a very small role.

Projects’ Social Effects: The Project Orientated Society

Ibolya Czibere

The new organisational strategy, Project Orientated Management was presented in 1990 in Vienna opening the third developmental stage of project management knowledge. This strategy is based on a fundamental coherence stating that every project functions as a temporary organisation and, therefore, offers strategic options for the usual organisational structures (with the incorporation of projects into the organisational structures, temporary organisations are created that disappear as soon as their individual task is done). This approach dramatically increases the importance of projects regardless of the previously known coherence that states a project created for various aims in public, non-profit and industrial sectors can heavily improve a company’s efficiency and its chances of survival as well. These processes result in power shifts in society and change the forms of knowledge utilization.

Oldalak